My next stop was to Quilter’s Stash in North Attleboro, MA.

Quilter's Stash

 

 

 

 

 

It is a quilter’s heaven, filled with fabric, fabric, fabric.

Quilter's Stash

 

 

 

 

 

Sue and her staff are fantastic!

Quilter's Stash

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While there, I spotted something wonderful!

Quilter's Stash

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A quilt made from my Belle Fleur fabric!

Quilter's Stash

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Love it!

My next stop was the Hartfort, CT area. I had a free morning, so I decided to visit the Mark Twain house.

Mark Twain House

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mark Twain house

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Throughout his career, Samuel Langhorne Clemens (Mark Twain) published more than 30 books,  hundreds of short stories and essays and gave lecture tours around the world. By the end of his life in 1910, Clemens had become known as the quintessential American author having captured in his works the spirit, character and even dialect of a diverse nation. His writing also served to voice his running commentary on American society. Thinly veiled behind the mask of humor and satire, Clemens’ writing often critiqued social morals, politics and human nature, making his literature a unique reflection of the American experience in the latter part of the nineteenth century.

His house in Hartford is defined mostly by the variety and unpredictability of its elements. No two elevations are alike; generally symmetrical gables are, upon closer inspection, subtly different in their decorative treatments: various chimneys and towers rise spontaneously in contrast to the calming, broad sweep of the deep porches and porte cochere. The painted brick diaper pattern seems to strain as it contains the shifting surfaces of the walls and the vigorously projecting bays.

Mark Twain house

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A visit to his house was truly inspiring. Even the flowers on the front porch were lovely.

Mark Twain house

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next to the Mark Twain house is the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center.

Harriet Beecher Stowe

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Harriet Beecher Stowe Center preserves and interprets Stowe’s Hartford home and the Center’s historic collections, promotes vibrant discussion of her life and work, and inspires commitment to social justice and positive change.

 

Stowe’s best known novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852), changed how Americans viewed the institution of slavery.   The book was a runaway best-seller, selling 10,000 copies in the United States in its first week; 300,000 in the first year; and in Great Britain, 1.5 million copies in one year.

My visit to New England was fulled with fun, fabric and food for thought. . .

 

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